Graduated, Now What?

Excellent interview questions, in reverse. My personal favorite: “What problems would you like to solve?” This may open a discussion that allows you to sell yourself as the prospective employer’s solution.

Real Life of an MSW

It takes two or three hours to write a specific cover letter, customize the resume, and go through all the ridiculous, dehumanizing, online hoops to apply for even a low-paying, part-time job, yet a business can’t spend one minute to send even a simple reply? Many applicants are your customers, you know. Or now former customers. This is your community, we’re your neighbors and you are rude. RANT

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What I hear often is “I did everything right: got good grades, participated in extracurricular activities, interned, reworked my resume over and over. Why can’t I get a job?” Oh, this reminds me of myself (read: The Entitled Intern – pages of a career journal for some insight and laughs). Though as a person who was once in these shoes, and now as an employer and a professor, I will say this is a common theme. Here are a few words of…

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The Entitled Intern

Great post about internships. Get as much out of it as you can because it’s more than merely a stepping stone to a job.

Real Life of an MSW

“You’ll never know what you’re capable of doing if you’re not given more than you think you can do”- Anonymous

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“I have not heard back from the clinic about the co-occurring mental health chemical dependency counselor position. Which upsets me, after all I interned there for a WHOLE year. I think of Marian Edelman’s words, or shall I say Six Lessons for Life. I work hard! I have initiative! I am persistence! Which, according to her, are magic carpet tools to success. So why didn’t I get the job? Today I have an interview for a social work position at _____.”

Reading this entry, I find myself laughing and wanting to slap the shit out of my younger self. I had clearly forgotten I was the intern, the HELP! I had slipped into the mindset of most students, which I was at the time. That mindset is thinking I…

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Lessons learned

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Image modified from pixabay.com / CCO Public Domain

A brutal email from a co-worker received Friday has been eating away at me all weekend. I’m trying to brush it off. After all, I don’t believe it will have any long lasting repercussions, at least not for me. For her, it will reflect badly for some time.

She was angry, and the emotion came through loud and clear. Actually, the words screamed rage, and her statements came across as marching orders. This commandeering was inappropriate on several levels, First of all, I don’t report to her, and she does not outrank me. However, even if that was the case, it would not justify the harsh tone. In the corporate workplace, professionalism and civility should take priority in all communications. Unless, we’re on a coffee break and chatting about personal matters, the office is out of bounds for emotionally charged talk. Additionally, her boss had already emailed me about the matter and in a more civil tone, so the co-worker’s email was superfluous and came off as a cowardly attempt to distance herself from any shared blame.

Having said that, she had a point. I had handled a situation badly. With a demanding tone of voice that is counter to our company values, she previously asked me to perform a task out of scope for my job. I consulted others for direction who agreed it was in fact her role to execute this but recommended I compromise. As a result, rather than taking a clear position to either decline the request or accept the lead to get the job done, I engaged other stakeholders to get the ball rolling without sharing this approach with my co-worker. This backfired, and I knew there would be pushback. Her manager’s email to me, which included an apology for not setting clear expectations, was acceptable. The co-worker’s email, on the other hand, was over the line.

So, how do I deal with stuff like this and stop obsessing over it? I look for lessons learned from the experience to glean value from it. In the past, I tried to erase such experiences from memory but have since decided that is a futile exercise and a waste of potential opportunity. I prefer to discover a takeaway, now that I have already invested so much time stewing over it. Here’s what I plan to do and not do next time:

  1. Use her email as an example of what not to do should I find myself in her shoes. It is unprofessional, unbecoming, nonproductive and inevitably perceived badly by colleagues and those up the chain who have read it via copy or forwarding.
  2. I should trust my gut instinct about the potential fallout of my own actions and take proactive steps to avoid it.
  3. In the future, I would make it a point to respond decisively, albeit diplomatically, to inappropriate delegation of tasks.

I am also examining my work style. There was a time when I shouldered problem resolution to the point that I didn’t even ask others for advice or support. My approach was: my work, my problem. When I became aware of how frequently others consulted me or asked for help, I decided I had been foolish in feeling that I was always on my own. But I went to the other extreme by following advice I knew, though well-intended, was likely to end badly. From now on, I will look for the middle ground. Using others as a sounding board is fine but in the end, it may be better to use your best judgment based on experience and emotional intelligence to anticipate what will produce the most favorable outcome.

Interview Advice – Just Be Yourself… As Long You’re Being A More Organised, Eloquent, Functioning Version Of Yourself That Is Better Than Your Actual Self In Pretty Much Every Single Way…

The interview process is brutal. I’ve never met anyone who looks forward to it or gets misty-eyed when it’s over. It helps to know you’re not alone and to see the humorous side of feeling exposed and vulnerable, as this post demonstrates so well. It’s so unfair really. In an environment where companies are competing for talent, shouldn’t prospective employees be conducting the interviews and assessing which company would best align with their career objectives?

Some Words That Say What I Think

Growing up and entering the real world can be a confusing and overwhelming process.

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A big part of becoming a fully-functioning adult is finding a job, which would be fine if it weren’t for the fact that finding a job can be quite hard.

Sometimes, looking for a job can feel like searching for a needle in a haystack and, when you finally locate the needle, another slightly more qualified person comes along with a big massive magnet.

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Other times, it can feel like trying to find Wally in a ‘Where’s Wally?’ book.

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But you’re up against a guy who already has contacts in the business.

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I have been looking for a graduate job for a while now and am therefore quite familiar with the application process.

A lot of job applications begin with a CV.

A CV is a summary of professional and academic achievements but it might be better described as a Verification…

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Are you targeting companies with student repayment benefits? 

I just read an article written by Zack Friedman in Forbes, entitled Student Loan Repayment: The Hottest Benefit of 2017. He lists the following 10 companies that offer student loan assistance as part of their benefit package:

  1. Fidelity
  2. PricewaterhouseCoopers
  3. Aetna
  4. Penguin Random House
  5. Natixis
  6. Nvidia
  7. First Republic
  8. Chugging
  9. Powertex Group
  10. Staples

I see this as an innovative and progressive move for business and hope it becomes a trend. If companies are demanding a higher education, their support in paying back student loans makes so much sense. From a corporate standpoint, it should prove to be an effective recruiting tool. For new graduates, it should bring some relief. Win-win.