Graduated, Now What?

Excellent interview questions, in reverse. My personal favorite: “What problems would you like to solve?” This may open a discussion that allows you to sell yourself as the prospective employer’s solution.

Real Life of an MSW

It takes two or three hours to write a specific cover letter, customize the resume, and go through all the ridiculous, dehumanizing, online hoops to apply for even a low-paying, part-time job, yet a business can’t spend one minute to send even a simple reply? Many applicants are your customers, you know. Or now former customers. This is your community, we’re your neighbors and you are rude. RANT

d

What I hear often is “I did everything right: got good grades, participated in extracurricular activities, interned, reworked my resume over and over. Why can’t I get a job?” Oh, this reminds me of myself (read: The Entitled Intern – pages of a career journal for some insight and laughs). Though as a person who was once in these shoes, and now as an employer and a professor, I will say this is a common theme. Here are a few words of…

View original post 435 more words

Advertisements

Turning the table on the interviewer

As a big fan of interviewing the interviewer, I recommend preparing carefully constructed questions for the end of the discussion that demonstrate your knowledge, interest in the position and critical thinking.  Find sample questions in my FAQ page.

Many job applicants squirm at the thought of the dreaded behavioral interview. Turning the table by asking the recruiter to give you examples of various scenarios enables you to probe and evaluate key information about the potential opportunity. These questions also send the message that you are an active participant in the process rather than someone who is meekly waiting in the wings for a job offer. The decision-making process works both ways.

Share your comments after you read the examples of reverse behavioral questions suggested in 7 Lies Employers Use To Trick You Into Working For Them.