Resumes – for men only

Resume writing – 1940s style. I posted this under Gail’s Blog and thought my mentees would enjoy it too.

Gail's Blog

old article on how to prepare a resume

“The majority of employers prefer to study a man’s résumé before inviting him in for an interview….Remember your prospective employer is a busy man…reach inside your coat pocket or briefcase…”

article

Cleaning out my belated father-in-law’s house has been arduous in many ways. Given his longevity and pack rat behavior, there is an overwhelming amount of stuff to go through. There is an adventurous side to this expedition though. Sometimes I feel like a DeLorean has transported me back to the mid-20th century, a time when men ruled the workplace, exemplified by this article on how to prepare a résumé. Since I write résumés professionally, I swooped this up, read it with askance and giggled.

The sexism and political incorrectness is shocking – or not, considering the advice was probably given in the late 1940s. The article is not dated, but the time period in the sample résumé and the references to work history during the war…

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Keep your resume updated even after you land a job

Congratulations! You landed the job of your dreams, or perhaps a stepping stone in the right direction. Now you’re thinking, If I never write another resume again, it will be too soon. I know how you feel, but don’t be so quick to bury this job search tool in the bottom of a dusty drawer.

Though some believe the resume is dead, buried by LinkedIn and other sites that offer online profiles, traditional resumes still have value. They are requested by hiring managers for prospective employees as well as internal promotions even if you post your entire work history online. Updating it while details are fresh on your mind is the easiest way to keep it current. You never know when opportunity will strike, either within or outside the company.

The best resumes go beyond generic job functions, delineating key achievements. Add a section to your resume if not already present, entitled Key Achievements or Highlights. Then, when you are assigned to a special project or task team, earn an award for top customer service or sales results, or initiate an idea that improves processes or saves the company money, add a statement or two in that section. Also, remember to add a section for professional affiliations, industry-related enrichment courses and certifications.

An additional benefit to updating a resume is to ensure that career track changes are reflected on paper. For example, if you are a human resources practitioner who started out in recruiting, but veered off into the benefits function, add that dimension to your profile statement and work experience. Depending on your next career step, tweak the resume to place more emphasis on the portion of your job history that correlates with your targeted role.

Save the document to your desktop or a career folder, so it’s handy and not easily forgotten. Even if you hire a professional to develop it, having all the descriptions and dates recorded will expedite the process. Not only will documenting newly acquired knowledge, experiences and successes enhance your resume in real time, but it’s like giving yourself a pat on the back. We could all use a little reminder now and then of what we have accomplished.